Franz schubert - brahms-streichquartett brahms-quartett streichquartett g-dur op. 161


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Yet the effect of this encounter with Beethoven’s orchestral music was intimidating as well as inspiring. Spaun reports that Schubert developed serious ambitions as a composer, nourished and encouraged in part by Beethoven’s music, but felt that he would never be able to compete on equal terms with the great man: ‘Er sagte dann ganz kleinlaut: Heimlich im stillen hoffe ich wohl selbst noch etwas aus mir machen zu können, aber wer vermag nach Beethoven noch etwas zu machen?’ (Then he added in an undertone: Secretly I still really hope to be able to make something of myself , but who can do anything now after Beethoven?). 5 Any composer in Vienna in the first quarter of the nineteenth century was, of course, working more or less in the shadow of Beethoven, who gradually acquired the status of a living legend, but the young Schubert, who was already able to appreciate the nature and scope of Beethoven’s genius while yet lacking the technical skill to emulate the older man, would have felt his inadequacy particularly keenly.

Born in Bavaria, Gluck left home at the age of fourteen and spent several years in Prague. Eventully he acquired enough money to travel and study music in Vienna and in Italy. Here he became acquainted with the styles of Baroque opera and composed several operas in the prevailing style. Between 1745 and 1760, he travelled over Europe during which time he was able to make a survey of the state of opera at the time. A musical theorist as well as a composer, by 1761 Gluck had come to the conclusion that the important elements in ballet and opera should be the story and the feelings of the characters, not the ridiculous intrigues, mistaken identities, and myriad sub-plots that had become the stock-in-trade of the Baroque opera. Gluck intended to reform the opera of the late eighteenth-century by abolishing vocal virtuosity for its own sake and causing the music to serve the needs of the drama.


Franz Schubert - Brahms-Streichquartett Brahms-Quartett Streichquartett G-dur Op. 161Franz Schubert - Brahms-Streichquartett Brahms-Quartett Streichquartett G-dur Op. 161Franz Schubert - Brahms-Streichquartett Brahms-Quartett Streichquartett G-dur Op. 161Franz Schubert - Brahms-Streichquartett Brahms-Quartett Streichquartett G-dur Op. 161

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